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Author: Carolyn Whelan

Carolyn Whelan

Carolyn is a writer, editor and analyst who covers the nexus between business and social justice issues. She broke into journalism at the Rio Earth Summit where she interviewed Al Gore and environmental pioneer David Brower. Topics covered since then range from climate change and higher education costs to drugs pricing, geopolitical strife, business ethics, artificial intelligence, gene editing, alternative energy and the search for good jobs -- and innovation in all these areas. Her pieces, reported from Europe, the US and South America have appeared in Fortune, Newsweek, the International Herald Tribune, the Wall Street Journal and SciAm.com. Previously she worked for the Economist Intelligence Unit, Barrons.com, Columbia Business School, WWF, the UN and PwC. Carolyn is fluent in French and Spanish and resides in Brooklyn.

LATEST ARTICLES

Governance
Government for a New Generation: Q&A with Donald Kettl

Government for a New Generation: Q&A with Donald Kettl

Professor Donald Kettl is a world-renowned expert in and professor of public affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School at the University of Texas, Austin. He’s a senior fellow at the Volcker Alliance and the

Sustainability
How Colombia Made Micromobility Cool: Q&A with Enrique Peñalosa

How Colombia Made Micromobility Cool: Q&A with Enrique Peñalosa

Bogotá, the capital city of Colombia, was a pioneer of micromobility long before anyone called it that. In the 1970s it launched “Ciclovía”, closing streets on Sunday to encourage cycling, which was just the beginning.

Energy
Luud Schimmelpennink: The Che Guevara Of Bike Sharing

Luud Schimmelpennink: The Che Guevara Of Bike Sharing

As an icon of the revolutionary spirit of the 1960s, the famous picture of Che Guevara in a beret has proved remarkably durable. Less familiar today, though created around the same time by the vanguard

Climate
Sharing is Caring: Equity through Micromobility

Sharing is Caring: Equity through Micromobility

When it comes to commuting, research shows that a mix of faster and more carbon-friendly ways of getting around bring outsized financial and health gains to low-income communities. Either paired with mass transit or on

Climate
Can Micromobility Make our Cities, Skies and Lives Healthier?

Can Micromobility Make our Cities, Skies and Lives Healthier?

The bicycle is an unlikely winner of the pandemic. In the past year, Paris has permanently cleared out cars on tony Rue de Rivoli near the Louvre to ease its flow of bikes, buses and

Climate
China’s Bike Boomerang

China’s Bike Boomerang

As the original ‘Bicycle Kingdom’, China was often associated with its iconic flying pigeon bicycles. Millions of state-backed bikes shuttled folks between farming jobs and home. But in the 1990s government officials started to encourage

Education
Building Education Back Better. Q&A with Emiliana Vegas

Building Education Back Better. Q&A with Emiliana Vegas

The pandemic has turned the education system upside down all over the world – creating massive challenges as schools locked down, but also genuine opportunities through embracing online learning, at least where technology is available.

Citizenship & Rights
America’s Election Integrity Compared. Q&A With David Carroll

America’s Election Integrity Compared. Q&A With David Carroll

Since 1989, the Atlanta, Georgia-based Carter Center has played a quiet but critical role in laying the groundwork for enduring democracy across the world. A non-partisan organization founded by former US president Jimmy Carter, the

Climate
In Some Places The Best Response To Climate Change Is Managed Retreat

In Some Places The Best Response To Climate Change Is Managed Retreat

Thanks to their inherent social distance and easier border control, island nations have tended to do a better job in managing the threat of COVID-19. Witness New Zealand, which declared victory just weeks into the

Housing
From A Cell To A Home: Housing Released Prisoners In The Pandemic

From A Cell To A Home: Housing Released Prisoners In The Pandemic

Crowded jails have emerged as a hotbed of COVID-19 with up to 40% of inmates in Los Angeles County infected by late May. To try to stop the spread, officials sharply reduced jail populations, releasing roughly 5,000

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